Accurate Analysis Begins with Smart Sampling

Chuck Zimmerman

Pioneer Hi-Bred Forage Forum Podcast At what point can inaccuracies plague the testing of corn silage? The greater potential for problems is not in the laboratory, but instead in the sampling, according to Dr. Bill Mahanna, coordinator of global nutritional sciences for Pioneer Hi-Bred. Because analysis can be no better than the samples themselves, Bill offers suggestions for performing steps safely and effectively, from acquisition to preservation to shipment. This includes alternative methods when the “magic number of 12” samples isn’t practical.

Fresh Measurements of Your Next Feed Crop

Chuck Zimmerman

Smooth transition to a new feed crop starts with analysis per back-to-basics guidelines. For example, separate the evaluations between the grass portion of your corn and the high- moisture grain. Open your mind, though, to new strategies, advises Dr. Bill Mahanna, coordinator of global nutritional sciences for Pioneer Hi-Bred. New testing methods are providing valuable information on degree of kernel …

Milk Price Forecast Up

Chuck Zimmerman

According to a story out from USDA today milk production is now forecast higher than first estimated for 2006. You can listen to the report by USDA’s Brenda Curtis, featuring the Chair of USDA´s World Outlook Board, Gerald Bange: Milk Price Forecast Story (1 min MP3) Bange also provided his thoughts on why the production forecast has been moved higher: …

Snaplage Makes Sense for High-Moisture Harvest

Chuck Zimmerman

While harvesting snaplage is not a new practice, it is becoming more appealing, says Dr. Bill Mahanna, coordinator of global nutritional services for Pioneer Hi-Bred. A leading reason is the advent of new, large silage choppers utilizing snapper heads with kernel processors. Primary benefits are improved tonnage with very good digestible fiber and high kernel starch. Pioneer has recently completed …

Large Animal Veterinarians in Iraq

Chuck Zimmerman

I have received an audio report from Iraq that you might find interesting. The email I received says it’s from Paul McKellips who’s on assignment with the Department of State at the U.S. Embassy in Iraq. The report: focuses on a US military team of large animal veterinarians who are training their Iraqi counterparts to improve and enhance livestock health in Iraq. Iraqi vets have already had a successful battle against H5N1 (avian influenza) and are making great strides against the country’s other serious diseases, including foot and mouth disease (FMD). American expertise and taxpayer dollars are having a positive impact on Iraq’s agricultural future.