Hesston Header Heightens Drydown

Andy Vance

AGCO’s Hesston line of hay equipment now features a new disc double conditioner header for faster drydown. The 9180 disc header features two sets of steel-on-steel herringbone conditioning rolls for smoother crop throughput and more thorough crimping. This system is known as the Advanced Conditioner System, or ACS. AGCO says efficent haymaking is about quality and time, and that the 9180 delivers, processing heavy crops faster and more evenly. The header also produces windrows that will dry down faster, with a more even crimping for a more palatable forage.

Agribusiness, Feed, Nutrition, Production

Caffeine or Calcium?

Chuck Zimmerman

Growing up, we always had milk at the table during meals. Soda was a special treat. At today’s tables though, it seems soda is replacing the traditional milk, with concerning results. In a recent survey of the New York State Dietetic Association (NYSDA), eighty-three percent of the 674 members cited calcium as the single nutrient most lacking in kids’ diets …

Dairy Group, Nutrition

Cutting Edge Alfalfa Chopping

Chuck Zimmerman

Pioneer Hi-Bred Forage Forum PodcastDr. Bill Mahanna, coordinator of global nutritional sciences for Pioneer Hi-Bred, weighs in on the recent interest in the dairy industry about how alfalfa can and should be chopped. The catalyst is the popularity of disk mowers, which allow chopping much lower to the ground. This can increase yields, but at what cost in stand longevity and forage quality?

Agribusiness, Audio, Forage Forum, Nutrition, Pioneer Hi-Bred

FDA Thinks Restaurants Should Sell More Milk

Andy Vance

Sounds like a fine idea to me. I sat at an Ohio State Ag Alumni awards banquet last year with an alum from the dairy biz. I was thrilled, being a multi-gallon per week milk drinker, when he ordered a pitcher of the milk for the whole table. His comment was that he was always amazed when he took his dairy clients to dinner that they rarely ordered milk, so he ordered it for them. Sounds like a good policy to me, like fueling your farm equipment with soy biodiesel or driving a flex-fuel car.

Government, Markets, Milk, Nutrition, Policy, Promotion

Selenium May Boost Bugs' Immunity

Andy Vance

That same mineral you may be using in your ration may be keeping the bugs in the field from getting sick. The latest research out from USDA’s Ag Research Service suggests that moderate dietary levels of selenium may actually strengthen insect immunity. Typically, high levels of selenium are toxic to pests, but studies with cabbage looper moths and tobacco budworms found that the group raised on artificially high, though not toxic, levels of selenium had a stronger immune response system, therefore lowering the effectiveness of microbial biological control agents used against them.

Education, Government, Nutrition, Production